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Volume 6 Supplement 6

Beyond the Genome 2012

Analyzing genomes: is there a duty to disclose?

The potential to discover unanticipated clinically significant genetic variants during the course of research has stimulated much debate about the obligations of researchers to communicate such findings to study participants. Published guidelines suggest that researchers have an obligation to communicate valid and significant results, especially if they are clinically actionable. I will present data on the practices and perspectives of investigators conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and will caution against the establishment of a general obligation to return results in research. I will compare the role-specific responsibilities of researchers with those of clinicians and discuss emerging standards for genomic analysis and communication of test results in the clinical setting.

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This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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McGuire, A. Analyzing genomes: is there a duty to disclose?. BMC Proc 6 (Suppl 6), O14 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1186/1753-6561-6-S6-O14

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/1753-6561-6-S6-O14

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Genetic Variant
  • Clinical Setting
  • Association Study
  • Genomic Analysis